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FREDERICK DOUGLASS
1818–1895
Frederick Douglass
Photo courtesy of Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture / Photographs and Prints Division.

One of America’s most prominent and well-known abolitionists, Douglass was born into slavery. At the age of 20 he escaped, settling in Boston. There he became involved in the abolitionist cause. He published his own newspaper, The North Star, and advocated for a number of other social justice causes, including workers’ rights and women’s suffrage. From the outset of the Civil War, he was one of the strongest advocates for a shift in the War’s aims from restoration of the Union to ending slavery. He also encouraged President Lincoln to allow African-Americans to fight in the Union Army. Douglass lived in Rochester from 1847 until the beginning of the Civil War. From there, he published his newspaper, offered his home as shelter to runaway slaves making their way to Canada, and continued to advocate for greater equality and justice for all people.

For More Information Please Visit: The Frederick Douglass Project at the University of Rochester

Stephen A. Schwarzman Building / Print Collection, Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs. Photo courtesy of Photographs and Prints Division, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, The New York Public Library.
Frederick Douglass at the 1850 Cazenovia Anti-Fugitive Slave Law Convention. Photo courtesy of the Collection of the Madison County Historical Society, Oneida, NY.
Portrait of Frederick Douglass, abolitionist, journalist, and social reformer. Photo courtesy of Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture / Photographs and Prints Division.

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